Tonka Moves Stables

By Terry Golson


For the last year, Tonka has been at a boarding barn which gave him impeccable care – a deeply bedded stall, clean water, daily all-day turnout, and excellent food. But it was a long drive for me, and there were no trails off of the property. In all honesty, Tonka and I were going a little stir-crazy.

I couldn’t believe when a stall at a barn closer to home became available. It’s a private stable, just seven horses. It has an indoor arena. It also has a large outdoor sand ring. It has trails that we can access without crossing a road!

I brought Tonka over on Friday. I wasn’t sure how he’d trailer – most of his experiences last year had been to and from the animal hospital. But, Tonka saw the trailer and walked right on. He looked eager. I could almost hear him say, Finally, something interesting to do! When he arrived, he was alert but obviously calm – he stops eating when stressed, and he didn’t stop chewing.

 

The barn was custom-designed for the owner’s large warmblood dressage horses, so for Tonka, the stall is huge. There was a flake of hay waiting for him. There are two types of hay that people around here feed: first cut or grass. First cut is coarser. Grass tends to be softer and greener. Both are good for horses. For the last four years, Tonka has been mostly fed first cut timothy hay. Tonka couldn’t believe his luck. This barn feeds grass. It is more delicious than first cut. He dove right in.

 

I gave Tonka an hour in the stall while I unpacked. Then he got turned out. He has his own grass paddock. It’s more like a field! It’s called #6. It’s the one furthest away from the barn. It’s surrounded on three sides by woods. Most of the horses find it too spooky to spend their days in.

 

Tonka has no such issues. First he said hello to DJ, his neighbor.

 

Then Tonka spied the pile of grass hay that the barn manager had set out for him in preparation for his arrival.

 

I stayed to watch. Just because a horse is initially quiet, doesn’t mean they’ll stay that way. The calming effects of the grass hay pile could wear off.

About ten minutes in, Tonka thought he’d come and visit me at the gate.

 

But then he thought better of it. He turned tail, did a little happy dance, and went back to his hay.

 

He ate facing away from the other horses, looking out at his domain.

 

Despite this being April, the weather forecast for the rest of the day was abysmal. The horses came in early afternoon. Which was okay with Tonka. He now has a large window to look out of. And there was more grass hay.

 

On Saturday the weather cleared, the snow melted, and we rode in the sand ring, in the indoor arena, and then we went out on the trail.

 

Tonka is getting to know his stablemates. They chat across the aisle.

 

This is the soft look of contentment.


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14 thoughts on “Tonka Moves Stables

  • Jeanne Ahern Mogayzel

    Good for you! Good for Tonk! I too will be changing barns shortly. I have been with the UConn program for-ever, We just bought a condo near New Bedford. Off we go on a new adventure!

  • Tracy

    Wow. Looks like a great place. I am such a fan of turnout…good turnout. And of horses being able to eat in the heads down position. Sounds like it was well worth the move. I remember a farmer telling me that he is always careful before making a decision to shift around his dairy cattle too much. “Cows,” he said, “have best friends.” These bovine relationships play a huge role in their happiness and health, and it’s reflected in their milk production. I found that fascinating at the time, but of course, it makes perfect sense. I hope Tonka can find an equine best friend who is near him many hours a day and that you find this barn a great landing spot for you, too!

    • Terry Golson Post author

      He’s already quite happy with the big chestnut in the adjacent paddock, and he and the horse in the stall next to him are playing nosey games. So, it’s looking good!

  • Jan

    So glad the move went smoothly, looks a wonderful set up. Far more relaxing when you have not got a long commute. Hope Tonka finds another friend like Maggie, everyone needs a friend. Happy trails. 🙂

  • Jennifer

    If I remember correctly the last stable was about 30 minutes away. How far is the drive to this new location? It looks very nice. And seems to be staffed with conscientious people. How fun with delicious food waiting for him. I enjoy reading about Tonka’s calm demeanor. I have learned a lot about horses from reading your blog.

    • Terry Golson Post author

      On a no-traffic day, it’s ten minutes closer, which doesn’t sound like a lot. But the other barn was often in a knot of traffic, so on those days, I’m saving lots of time!